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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2017, Article ID 6932798, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6932798
Research Article

Composites of Heavy Rain Producing Elevated Thunderstorms in the Central United States

1Department of Soil, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Missouri, 302 ABNR, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
2NWS Operations Proving Ground, CIMSS/SSEC, University of Wisconsin–Madison, NOAA/NWS Training Center, 7220 N.W.101st Terr, Kansas City, MO 64153, USA
3Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University, O’Neil Hall, Room 205A, 3642 Lindell Blvd, Saint Louis, MO 63108, USA
4The College at Brockport, State University of New York, 350 New Campus Drive, Brockport, NY 14420-2936, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Patrick S. Market; ude.iruossim@ptekram

Received 23 December 2016; Revised 9 March 2017; Accepted 19 March 2017; Published 20 June 2017

Academic Editor: Zheng Duan

Copyright © 2017 Laurel P. McCoy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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