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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8406379, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8406379
Research Article

A Case Study of Anomalous Snowfall with an Alberta Clipper

1Department of the Earth Sciences, The College at Brockport, State University of New York, Brockport, NY, USA
2Department of Soil, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA
3NOAA/NWS Operational Proving Ground, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Kansas City, MO, USA
4The Weather Channel, Atlanta, GA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Scott M. Rochette; ude.tropkcorb.cse@ettehcor

Received 18 May 2017; Revised 9 August 2017; Accepted 17 August 2017; Published 31 October 2017

Academic Editor: Enrico Ferrero

Copyright © 2017 Scott M. Rochette et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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