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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2018, Article ID 2650642, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2650642
Research Article

The Impact of Façade Orientation and Woody Vegetation on Summertime Heat Stress Patterns in a Central European Square: Comparison of Radiation Measurements and Simulations

1Department of Climatology and Landscape Ecology, University of Szeged, Egyetem u. 2, 6722 Szeged, Hungary
2School of Technology and Business Studies, Dalarna University, 79188 Falun, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to János Unger; uh.degezs-u.oeg@regnu

Received 11 September 2017; Accepted 12 November 2017; Published 15 January 2018

Academic Editor: Hiroshi Tanaka

Copyright © 2018 Noémi Kántor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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