Table of Contents
Advances in Nephrology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 764682, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/764682
Review Article

Planar Cell Polarity Pathway in Kidney Development and Function

Department of Medicine and Physiology, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, 3775 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4

Received 17 September 2014; Revised 25 January 2015; Accepted 8 February 2015

Academic Editor: Carlos G. Musso

Copyright © 2015 Brittany Rocque and Elena Torban. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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