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Anemia
Volume 2012, Article ID 156598, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/156598
Research Article

Elevated Circulating Angiogenic Progenitors and White Blood Cells Are Associated with Hypoxia-Inducible Angiogenic Growth Factors in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Dr. NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive, SW Atlanta, GA 30310-1495, USA
3Cardiovascular Research Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive, SW Atlanta, GA 30310-1495, USA
4Morehouse College, 830 Westview Dr SW, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA
5Biostatistics Core, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive, SW Atlanta, GA 30310-1495, USA
6Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 1462 Clifton Road N.E. Suite 507, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 29 January 2012; Accepted 22 March 2012

Academic Editor: Kenneth R. Peterson

Copyright © 2012 Solomon F. Ofori-Acquah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We studied the number and function of angiogenic progenitor cells and growth factors in children aged 5–18 years without acute illness, 43 with Hemoglobin SS and 68 with normal hemoglobin. Hemoglobin SS subjects had at least twice as many mononuclear cell colonies and more circulating progenitor cell than Control subjects. Plasma concentrations of erythropoietin, angiopoietin-2, and stromal-derived growth factor (SDF)-1α were significantly higher in children with Hemoglobin SS compared to Control subjects. In a multivariate analysis model, SDF-1α concentration was found to be associated with both CPC number and total white blood cell count in the Hemoglobin SS group, suggesting that SDF-1α produced by ischemic tissues plays a role in mobilizing these cells in children with Hemoglobin SS. Despite having a higher number of angiogenic progenitor cells, children with Hemoglobin SS had slower migration of cultured mononuclear cells.