Table of Contents
Advances in Neuroscience
Volume 2014, Article ID 235479, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/235479
Review Article

Improving Cognitive Function from Children to Old Age: A Systematic Review of Recent Smart Ageing Intervention Studies

1Human and Social Response Research Division, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
2Department of Advanced Brain Science, Smart Ageing International Research Center, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
3Department of Functional Brain Imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan

Received 12 March 2014; Accepted 30 June 2014; Published 11 August 2014

Academic Editor: Daniela Schulz

Copyright © 2014 Rui Nouchi and Ryuta Kawashima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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