Table of Contents
Advances in Nursing
Volume 2015, Article ID 941589, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/941589
Research Article

Registered Nurses’ Experiences with the Medication Administration Process

1Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 1, 20520 Turku, Finland
2Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), Department of Information Technologies, Åbo Akademi University, Joukahaisenkatu 3-5 A, 20520 Turku, Finland

Received 21 May 2015; Revised 26 August 2015; Accepted 27 August 2015

Academic Editor: Ann M. Mitchell

Copyright © 2015 Hanna Pirinen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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