Table of Contents
Advances in Orthopedic Surgery
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 873785, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/873785
Research Article

A Comparison of Mortality following Distal Femoral Fractures and Hip Fractures in an Elderly Population

1Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Bordesley Green East, Birmingham B9 5SS, UK
2Worcester Royal Hospital, Charles Hastings Way, Worcester WR5 1DD, UK

Received 1 June 2014; Revised 13 July 2014; Accepted 22 July 2014; Published 7 August 2014

Academic Editor: Werner Kolb

Copyright © 2014 R. W. Jordan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Patients suffering a distal femoral fracture are at a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Currently this cohort is not afforded the same resources as those with hip fractures. This study aims to compare their mortality rates and assess whether surgical intervention improves either outcome or mortality following distal femoral fractures. Methods. Patients over sixty-five admitted with a distal femoral fracture between June 2007 and 2012 were retrospectively identified. Patients mobility was categorised as unaided, walking aid, zimmer frame, or immobile. The 30-day, six-month, and one-year mortality rates were recorded for this group as well as for hip fractures during the same period. Results. 68 patients were included in the study. The mortality rate for all patients with distal femoral fractures was 7% at 30 days, 26% at six months, and 38% at one year, higher than hip fractures during the same period by 8%, 13%, and 18%, respectively. Patients managed surgically had lower mortality rates and higher mobility levels. Conclusion. Patients suffering a distal femoral fracture have a high mortality rate and surgical intervention seems to improve both mobility and mortality.