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Advances in Preventive Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 960263, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/960263
Research Article

Predictors of Self-Management Behaviors in Older Adults with Hypertension

Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, 103 Robinson Hall, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 30 June 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Jim Tartaglia

Copyright © 2015 Brenda M. Douglas and Elizabeth P. Howard. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a prediction model of demographic and sociobehavioral characteristics common among older adults with hypertension (HTN) who engage in self-management behavior. A descriptive, correlational predictive design was used to collect data at 14 faith-based and senior citizen organizations in a major urban northeastern city. Participants ranged in age from 63 to 96 with a mean age of 77 (SD 6.9). A 33-item questionnaire was used to gather data on 15 explanatory and 5 outcome variables. Instruments were the Perceived Stress Scale, the Duke Social Support Index, the stage of change for physical activity scale, and the DASH Food Frequency Questionnaire. Correlation and regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis. Results indicate there is a common set of characteristics such as higher stage of change, reading food labels, and higher self-rated health that can predict the older adult’s likelihood to engage in hypertension self-management behavior. The significant correlations found in this preliminary study warrant further study and validation. Findings are clinically relevant as knowledge of demographic and sociobehavioral characteristics associated with engagement in self-management behavior enables health care clinicians to support and encourage older adults to improve management of this common, chronic condition.