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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2009, Article ID 405107, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/405107
Research Article

Monoamines, BDNF, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA-Sulfate, and Childhood Depression—An Animal Model Study

1Interdisciplinary Program in the Brain Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
2The Gonda (Goldschmied) Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
3Department of Psychology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
4Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Beilinson Campus, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Petah Tikva 49100, Israel
5Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel

Received 9 February 2009; Revised 8 June 2009; Accepted 24 July 2009

Academic Editor: Alison Oliveto

Copyright © 2009 O. Malkesman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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