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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2011, Article ID 608912, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/608912
Research Article

A Comparison of the 𝜶 2/3/5 Selective Positive Allosteric Modulators L-838,417 and TPA023 in Preclinical Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

Discovery Biology, Pfizer Inc., Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, Kent CT13 9NJ, UK

Received 15 March 2011; Accepted 28 July 2011

Academic Editor: John Atack

Copyright © 2011 Sarah Nickolls et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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