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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2015, Article ID 682745, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/682745
Research Article

High-Dose Estradiol-Replacement Therapy Enhances the Renal Vascular Response to Angiotensin II via an AT2-Receptor Dependent Mechanism

1Department of Physiology, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2Water & Electrolytes Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3Department of Physiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4Isfahan MN Institute of Basic & Applied Sciences Research, Isfahan, Iran
5Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia

Received 14 September 2015; Accepted 5 November 2015

Academic Editor: Todd C. Skaar

Copyright © 2015 Tahereh Safari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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