Table of Contents
Advances in Psychiatry
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 968359, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/968359
Research Article

Emotional Intelligence and Personality in Anxiety Disorders

1Center for Research and Development of Emotional Intelligence (CIDIE), C/Marià Fortuny, 26-28, 1°-6a, 08301 Mataró, Spain
2FPCEE Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, C/Císter 34, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
3Maresme Health Consortium C/Prolongació Cirera, s/n, 08304 Mataró, Spain
4Erich Fromm Institute of Humanist Psychotherapy, C/Madrazo, 113 Entlo. 2°, 08021 Barcelona, Spain

Received 24 July 2014; Accepted 21 November 2014; Published 16 December 2014

Academic Editor: Takahiro Nemoto

Copyright © 2014 Nathalie P. Lizeretti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Anxiety disorders (AD) are by far the most frequent psychiatric disorders, and according to epidemiologic data their chronicity, comorbidities, and negative prognostic constitute a public health problem. This is why it is necessary to continue exploring the factors which contribute to the incidence, appearance, and maintenance of this set of disorders. The goal of this study has been to analyze the possible relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and personality disorders (PersD) in outpatients suffering from AD. The sample was made up of 146 patients with AD from the Mental Health Center at the Health Consortium of Maresme, who were evaluated with the STAI, MSCEIT, and MCMI-II questionnaires. The main findings indicate that 89,4% of the patients in the sample met the criteria for the diagnosis of some PersD. The findings also confirm that patients with AD present a low EI, especially because of difficulties in the skills of emotional comprehension and regulation, and the lack of these skills is related to a higher level of anxiety and the presence of PersD. These findings suggest the need to consider emotional skills of EI and personality as central elements for the diagnosis and treatment of AD.