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Volume 2010, Article ID 453642, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/453642
Review Article

Selenocysteine, Pyrrolysine, and the Unique Energy Metabolism of Methanogenic Archaea

1Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Molekulare Mikrobiologie & Bioenergetik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, 376 Biological Sciences Building 484 West 12th Avenue Columbus, OH 43210-1292, USA

Received 15 June 2010; Accepted 13 July 2010

Academic Editor: Jerry Eichler

Copyright © 2010 Michael Rother and Joseph A. Krzycki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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