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Archaea
Volume 2013, Article ID 582646, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/582646
Research Article

Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

1Department of Hydrobiology, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Avenida San Rafael Atlixco No. 86, Colonia Vicentina, 09340 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
2Department of Biotechnology, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Avenida San Rafael Atlixco No. 86, Colonia Vicentina, 09340 Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Received 27 July 2012; Revised 30 October 2012; Accepted 3 December 2012

Academic Editor: Martin Krüger

Copyright © 2013 María del Rocío Torres-Alvarado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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