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Volume 2014, Article ID 671059, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/671059
Research Article

Genome-Wide miRNA Seeds Prediction in Archaea

1State Key Lab of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100781, China

Received 4 March 2014; Revised 14 April 2014; Accepted 28 April 2014; Published 14 May 2014

Academic Editor: Paola Londei

Copyright © 2014 Shengqin Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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