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Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 235384, 12 pages
Research Article

Assessment of the Carbon Monoxide Metabolism of the Hyperthermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus VC-16 by Comparative Transcriptome Analyses

Department of Biology, Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway

Received 10 April 2015; Revised 9 June 2015; Accepted 14 June 2015

Academic Editor: Uwe Deppenmeier

Copyright © 2015 William P. Hocking et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


The hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, utilizes CO as an energy source and it is resistant to the toxic effects of high CO concentrations. Herein, transcription profiles were obtained from A. fulgidus during growth with CO and sulfate or thiosulfate, or without an electron acceptor. This provided a basis for a model of the CO metabolism of A. fulgidus. The model suggests proton translocation by “Mitchell-type” loops facilitated by Fqo catalyzing a :menaquinone oxidoreductase reaction, as the major mode of energy conservation, rather than formate or H2 cycling during respiratory growth. The bifunctional CODH (cdhAB-2) is predicted to play an ubiquitous role in the metabolism of CO, and a novel nitrate reductase-associated respiratory complex was induced specifically in the presence of sulfate. A potential role of this complex in relation to and APS reduction is discussed. Multiple membrane-bound heterodisulfide reductase (DsrMK) could promote both energy-conserving and non-energy-conserving menaquinol oxidation. Finally, the FqoF subunit may catalyze a :F420 oxidoreductase reaction. In the absence of electron acceptor, downregulation of F420H2 dependent steps of the acetyl-CoA pathway is linked to transient formate generation. Overall, carboxidotrophic growth seems as an intrinsic capacity of A. fulgidus with little need for novel resistance or respiratory complexes.