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Volume 2016, Article ID 7316725, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7316725
Research Article

Deciphering the Translation Initiation Factor 5A Modification Pathway in Halophilic Archaea

1Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences and Genetic Institute, University of Florida, P.O. Box 110700, Gainesville, FL 32611-0700, USA
2Gene Center and Department for Biochemistry, University of Munich, 81377 Munich, Germany
3Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich, University of Munich, 81377 Munich, Germany
4Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
5Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, 91 N. Eagleville Rd, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
6Institute of Environmental Microbiology, Kyowa Kako Co. Ltd., Tadao 2-15-5, Machida 194-0035, Japan

Received 7 September 2016; Revised 27 October 2016; Accepted 6 November 2016

Academic Editor: Michael Ibba

Copyright © 2016 Laurence Prunetti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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