Table of Contents
Anatomy Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 483186, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/483186
Research Article

Pes Anserinus Structural Framework and Constituting Tendons Are Grossly Aberrant in Nigerian Population

1Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bowen University, Iwo 284, Osun State, Nigeria
2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin 1515, Kwara State, Nigeria
3Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti 5363, Ekiti State, Nigeria

Received 6 May 2015; Revised 15 June 2015; Accepted 16 June 2015

Academic Editor: Robert J. Spinner

Copyright © 2015 J. O. Ashaolu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We evaluated the morphological framework of the pes anserinus in both knees of ten Nigerian cadavers and we observed high degree of variability in its morphology and location. The pes anserinus inserted specifically on the superior half of the media border of the tibia, as far inferiorly as 124.44 mm to the tibial tuberosity (prolonged insertion). The insertion was also joined to the part of tibia close to the tibia tuberosity (90%) and to the fascia cruris (10%). The initial insertion point of the pes anserinus was always found at the level of the tibia tuberosity. We found out that accessory bands of sartorius, gracilis, or semitendinosus were part of the pes anserinus in 95% of all occasions studied whereas the combined occurrence of monotendinosus sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus tendons was found in only 5% of all occasions. The pes anserinus did not conform to the layered pattern and the tendons of sartorius, gracilis, or semitendinosus were short. The inferior prolongation of the pes anserinus connotes extended surface area of attachment to support the mechanical pull from the hamstring muscles. This information will be useful in precise location and grafting of the pes anserinus.