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AIDS Research and Treatment
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 231956, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/231956
Research Article

Smartphone Delivery of Mobile HIV Risk Reduction Education

National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, BRC Building, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA

Received 19 April 2013; Revised 20 June 2013; Accepted 17 July 2013

Academic Editor: Seth Himelhoch

Copyright © 2013 Karran A. Phillips et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We sought to develop and deploy a video-based smartphone-delivered mobile HIV Risk Reduction (mHIVRR) intervention to individuals in an addiction treatment clinic. We developed 3 video modules that consisted of a 10-minute HIVRR video, 11 acceptability questions, and 3 knowledge questions and deployed them as a secondary study within a larger study of ecological momentary and geographical momentary assessments. All 24 individuals who remained in the main study long enough completed the mHIVRR secondary study. All 3 videos met our a priori criteria for acceptability “as is” in the population: they achieved median scores of ≤2.5 on a 5-point Likert scale; ≤20% of the individuals gave them the most negative rating on the scale; a majority of the individuals stated that they would not prefer other formats over video-based smartphone-delivered one (all ). Additionally, all of our video modules met our a priori criteria for feasibility: ≤20% of data were missing due to participant noncompliance and ≤20% were missing due to technical failure. We concluded that video-based mHIVRR education delivered via smartphone is acceptable, feasible and may increase HIV/STD risk reduction knowledge. Future studies, with pre-intervention assessments of knowledge and random assignment, are needed to confirm these findings.