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AIDS Research and Treatment
Volume 2018, Article ID 5908167, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5908167
Research Article

The Palatability of Lopinavir and Ritonavir Delivered by an Innovative Freeze-Dried Fast-Dissolving Tablet Formulation

1Department of Psychology, Wofford College, 429 North Church Street, Spartanburg, SC 29303, USA
2PATH, 2201 Westlake Avenue, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98121, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to David W. Pittman; ude.droffow@wdnamttip

Received 17 July 2017; Accepted 3 December 2017; Published 17 January 2018

Academic Editor: David Katzenstein

Copyright © 2018 David W. Pittman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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