Table of Contents
Advances in Toxicology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 575403, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/575403
Review Article

Systems Biology and Synthetic Biology: A New Epoch for Toxicology Research

1Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Thornton Science Park, Chester CH2 4NU, UK
2Departments of Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, SUNY Albany, School of Public Health, One University Place, Rm 153, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3456, USA
3Faculty of Health and Social Care, Edge Hill University, St. Helens Road, Ormskirk, Lancashire L39 4QP, UK
4Division of Genetics, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12208, USA
5Molecular Toxicology, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, USA

Received 1 August 2014; Accepted 21 December 2014

Academic Editor: Kanji Yamasaki

Copyright © 2015 Mark T. Mc Auley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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