Table of Contents
Advances in Toxicology
Volume 2016, Article ID 7569157, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7569157
Research Article

Higher Blood Lead Levels among Childbearing Women in Nearby Addis Ababa-Adama Highway, Ethiopia

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Received 15 December 2015; Revised 23 February 2016; Accepted 3 March 2016

Academic Editor: Jennifer L. Freeman

Copyright © 2016 Daniel Haile Chercos and Haimanot Gebrehiwot Moges. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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