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Advances in Urology
Volume 2017, Article ID 8541697, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8541697
Research Article

Distribution of Neuroendocrine Cells in the Transition Zone of the Prostate

Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Naoya Masumori; pj.ca.dempas@iromusam

Received 11 November 2016; Revised 10 February 2017; Accepted 14 February 2017; Published 1 March 2017

Academic Editor: James A. Brown

Copyright © 2017 Yuki Kyoda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the distribution of neuroendocrine (NE) cells which may influence the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the transition zone (TZ). Methods. We reviewed specimens from 80 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy in our institution and evaluated the density of NE cells in the TZ. They were histologically classified into 3 groups: those with no adenomatous nodule in the TZ (group A), those with small nodules with normal epithelium and stroma around them in the TZ (group B), and those with large nodules occupying the TZ (group C). In the patients of group B, intra-adenoma (adenomatous nodules) and extra-adenoma (normal tissue) NE cells in the TZ were separately counted. Results. There were 22, 23, and 35 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The median density of NE cells in the TZ of group B patients, 2.80/mm2, was significantly higher than that of NE cells in group A, 1.43/mm2, and group C, 0.61/mm2 (). In group B, the median density of extra-adenoma NE cells was significantly higher than that of intra-adenoma. Conclusions. Many NE cells exist around small adenoma in the TZ. NE cells may influence the initial growth of BPH in a paracrine fashion. Trial Registration. This study approved by our institutional review board was retrospectively registered (#272-14).