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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 681627, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/681627
Review Article

Autism, Context/Noncontext Information Processing, and Atypical Development

Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London NW1 2HE, UK

Received 29 October 2010; Revised 16 March 2011; Accepted 6 June 2011

Academic Editor: Johannes Rojahn

Copyright © 2011 John R. Skoyles. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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