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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 146132, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/146132
Review Article

The Development of Executive Function in Autism

1Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE), Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London WC1H 0AA, UK
2School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

Received 9 February 2012; Accepted 7 May 2012

Academic Editor: Hilde M. Geurts

Copyright © 2012 Elizabeth Pellicano. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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