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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 709861, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/709861
Research Article

What Works for You? Using Teacher Feedback to Inform Adaptations of Pivotal Response Training for Classroom Use

1Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Autism Discovery Institute, Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, 3020 Children's Way, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109, USA

Received 8 June 2012; Accepted 8 October 2012

Academic Editor: Bryan King

Copyright © 2012 Aubyn C. Stahmer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Several evidence-based practices (EBPs) have been identified as efficacious for the education of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, effectiveness research has rarely been conducted in schools and teachers express skepticism about the clinical utility of EBPs for the classroom. Innovative methods are needed to optimally adapt EBPs for community use. This study utilizes qualitative methods to identify perceived benefits and barriers of classroom implementation of a specific EBP for ASD, Pivotal Response Training (PRT). Teachers' perspectives on the components of PRT, use of PRT as a classroom intervention strategy, and barriers to the use of PRT were identified through guided discussion. Teachers found PRT valuable; however, they also found some components challenging. Specific teacher recommendations for adaptation and resource development are discussed. This process of obtaining qualitative feedback from frontline practitioners provides a generalizable model for researchers to collaborate with teachers to optimally promote EBPs for classroom use.