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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 709861, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/709861
Research Article

What Works for You? Using Teacher Feedback to Inform Adaptations of Pivotal Response Training for Classroom Use

1Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Autism Discovery Institute, Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, 3020 Children's Way, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109, USA

Received 8 June 2012; Accepted 8 October 2012

Academic Editor: Bryan King

Copyright © 2012 Aubyn C. Stahmer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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