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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 910946, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/910946
Review Article

Is Autism a Member of a Family of Diseases Resulting from Genetic/Cultural Mismatches? Implications for Treatment and Prevention

1Systems and Integrative Neuroscience Group, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA

Received 12 September 2011; Revised 18 January 2012; Accepted 10 April 2012

Academic Editor: Antonio M. Persico

Copyright © 2012 Staci D. Bilbo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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