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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2013, Article ID 128264, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/128264
Review Article

Theory of Mind Deficit versus Faulty Procedural Memory in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Outpatient Service, “Dr. Samuel Ramírez Moreno” Psychiatric Hospital, Health Secretariat, Autopista México-Puebla Km 5.5 Santa Catarina, Tláhuac, 13100 Mexico, DF, Mexico

Received 14 February 2013; Revised 19 May 2013; Accepted 20 May 2013

Academic Editor: Manuel F. Casanova

Copyright © 2013 Miguel Ángel Romero-Munguía. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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