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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 839890, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/839890
Review Article

Parent Training Interventions for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1H 5N4

Received 23 January 2014; Revised 25 March 2014; Accepted 12 April 2014; Published 7 May 2014

Academic Editor: Manuel F. Casanova

Copyright © 2014 Audrée Jeanne Beaudoin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Now that early identification of toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is possible, efforts are being made to develop interventions for children under three years of age. Most studies on early intervention have focused on intensive and individual interventions. However, parent training interventions that help parents interact and communicate with their toddlers with ASD might be a good alternative to promote the development of their child’s sociocommunicative skills. Objective. This review aims to systematically examine (1) the use of parent training interventions for children with ASD under three years of age and (2) their effects on children’s development, parents’ well-being and parent-child interactions. Methods. Systematic searches were conducted to retrieve studies in which at least one parent was trained to implement ASD-specific techniques with their toddlers (0–36 months old) with a diagnosis of or suspected ASD. Results. Fifteen studies, involving 484 children (mean age: 23.26 months), were included in this review. Only two of them met criteria for conclusive evidence. Results show that parents were able to implement newly learned strategies and were generally very satisfied with parent training programs. However, findings pertaining to the children’s communication and socioemotional skills, parent-child interactions, and parental well-being were inconclusive.