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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 924182, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/924182
Research Article

Disability Identification and Self-Efficacy among College Students on the Autism Spectrum

1A. J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, 3020 Market Street, Suite 560, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
3SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, BS169, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493, USA

Received 25 November 2013; Accepted 15 January 2014; Published 23 February 2014

Academic Editor: Geraldine Dawson

Copyright © 2014 Paul T. Shattuck et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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