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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2016, Article ID 6309189, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6309189
Research Article

Theory of Mind Indexes the Broader Autism Phenotype in Siblings of Children with Autism at School Age

1Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
2Department of Psychology, College of Staten Island and The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY 10314, USA
3Department of Psychiatry & Bio-Behavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA

Received 30 September 2015; Accepted 17 December 2015

Academic Editor: Klaus-Peter Ossenkopp

Copyright © 2016 Tawny Tsang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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