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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2017, Article ID 8195129, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8195129
Research Article

Autistic Traits Affect P300 Response to Unexpected Events, regardless of Mental State Inferences

1Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
2Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Mitsuhiko Ishikawa; pj.ca.u-otoyk.ts@r32.okihustim.awakihsi

Received 22 December 2016; Revised 18 March 2017; Accepted 9 April 2017; Published 4 June 2017

Academic Editor: Robert F. Berman

Copyright © 2017 Mitsuhiko Ishikawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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