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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 5093016, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5093016
Research Article

A Study of the Correlation between VEP and Clinical Severity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

1Kanchanabhishek Institute of Medical and Public Health Technology, Nonthaburi 11150, Thailand
2Research Center for Neuroscience, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand
3Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand

Correspondence should be addressed to Vorasith Siripornpanich; moc.liamg@htisarovrd

Received 25 September 2017; Revised 1 December 2017; Accepted 14 December 2017; Published 14 January 2018

Academic Editor: Klaus-Peter Ossenkopp

Copyright © 2018 Winai Sayorwan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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