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Advances in Virology
Volume 2010, Article ID 649315, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/649315
Review Article

Towards Inhibition of Vif-APOBEC3G Interaction: Which Protein to Target?

URIA-Centro Patogénese Molecular and Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade Lisboa, Avenue Das Forcas Armadas, 1649-019 Lisboa, Portugal

Received 2 May 2010; Revised 31 July 2010; Accepted 14 August 2010

Academic Editor: Michael Bukrinsky

Copyright © 2010 Iris Cadima-Couto and Joao Goncalves. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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