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Advances in Virology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 370606, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/370606
Review Article

Association of Influenza Virus Proteins with Membrane Rafts

Department of Immunology and Molecular Biology, Veterinary Faculty, Free University Berlin, Philippstraße 13, 10115 Berlin, Germany

Received 15 March 2011; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editor: Carolina B. Lopez

Copyright © 2011 Michael Veit and Bastian Thaa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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