Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Virology
Volume 2015, Article ID 769837, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/769837
Research Article

Measles Virus: Identification in the M Protein Primary Sequence of a Potential Molecular Marker for Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis

Hasan Kweder,1,2,3,4,5 Michelle Ainouze,1,2,3,4,5 Joanna Brunel,1,2,3,4,5 Denis Gerlier,1,2,3,4,5 Evelyne Manet,1,2,3,4,5 and Robin Buckland1,2,3,4,5

1CIRI, International Center for Infectiology Research, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon, France
2Inserm, U1111, 69007 Lyon, France
3Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 69007 Lyon, France
4Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, Université Lyon 1, 69007 Lyon, France
5CNRS, UMR 5308, Lyon, France

Received 31 May 2015; Revised 6 September 2015; Accepted 17 September 2015

Academic Editor: Robert C. Gallo

Copyright © 2015 Hasan Kweder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. T. F. Wild and R. Buckland, “Functional aspects of envelope-associated measles virus proteins,” in Measles Virus, V. ter Meulen and M. Billeter, Eds., vol. 191 of Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, pp. 51–64, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. T. Cathomen, H. Y. Naim, and R. Cattaneo, “Measles viruses with altered envelope protein cytoplasmic tails gain cell fusion competence,” Journal of Virology, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 1224–1234, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. T. Cathomen, B. Mrkic, D. Spehner et al., “A matrix-less measles virus is infectious and elicits extensive cell fusion: consequences for propagation in the brain,” The EMBO Journal, vol. 17, no. 14, pp. 3899–3908, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. Y. Yanagi, M. Takeda, S. Ohno, and T. Hashiguchi, “Measles virus receptors,” Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, vol. 329, pp. 13–30, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. D. Mühlebach, M. Mateo, P. L. Sinn et al., “Adherens junction protein nectin-4 is the epithelial receptor for measles virus,” Nature, vol. 480, no. 7378, pp. 530–533, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. R. S. Noyce, D. G. Bondre, M. N. Ha et al., “Tumor cell marker pvrl4 (nectin 4) is an epithelial cell receptor for measles virus,” PLoS Pathogens, vol. 7, no. 8, Article ID e1002240, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. Takeda, M. Tahara, N. Nagata, and F. Seki, “Wild-type measles virus is intrinsically dual-tropic,” Frontiers in Microbiology, vol. 2, article 279, 7 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. R. Dawson Jr., “cellular inclusions in cerebral lesions of epidemic encephalitis: second report,” Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 685–700, 1934. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. J. Gutierrez, R. S. Issacson, and B. S. Koppel, “Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: an update,” Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, vol. 52, no. 10, pp. 901–907, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. B. K. Rima, “Molecular biological basis of measles virus strain differences,” in Measles and Poliomyelitis, E. Kurstak, Ed., pp. 151–160, Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  11. B. K. Rima, “The pathogenesis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis,” Reviews in Medical Virology, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 81–90, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. B. K. Rima and W. P. Duprex, “Molecular mechanisms of measles virus persistence,” Virus Research, vol. 111, no. 2, pp. 132–147, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. A. Billeter, R. Cattaneo, P. Spielhofer et al., “Generation and properties of measles virus mutations typically associated with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 724, pp. 367–377, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. R. Cattaneo, A. Schmid, M. A. Billeter, R. D. Sheppard, and S. A. Udem, “Multiple viral mutations rather than host factors cause defective measles virus gene expression in a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis cell line,” Journal of Virology, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 1388–1397, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. R. Cattaneo, A. Schmid, D. Eschle, K. Baczko, V. ter Meulen, and M. A. Billeter, “Biased hypermutation and other genetic changes in defective measles viruses in human brain infections,” Cell, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 255–265, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. R. Cattaneo, A. Schmid, P. Spielhofer et al., “Mutated and hypermutated genes of persistent measles viruses which caused lethal human brain diseases,” Virology, vol. 173, no. 2, pp. 415–425, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. A. Bitnun, P. Shannon, A. Durward et al., “Measles inclusion-body encephalitis caused by the vaccine strain of measles virus,” Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 855–861, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. D. R. Hardie, C. Albertyn, J. M. Heckmann, and H. E. Smuts, “Molecular characterisation of virus in the brains of patients with measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE),” Virology Journal, vol. 10, article 283, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. H. Kweder, M. Ainouze, S. L. Cosby et al., “Mutations in the H, F, or M proteins can facilitate resistance of measles virus to neutralizing human anti-MV sera,” Advances in Virology, vol. 2014, Article ID 205617, 18 pages, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. L. Jin, S. Beard, R. Hunjan, D. W. G. Brown, and E. Miller, “Characterization of measles virus strains causing SSPE: a study of 11 cases,” Journal of NeuroVirology, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 335–344, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. P. A. Rota, K. Brown, A. Mankertz et al., “Global distribution of measles genotypes and measles molecular epidemiology,” Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 204, supplement 1, pp. S514–S523, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. D. E. Griffin, “Emergence and re-emergence of viral diseases of the central nervous system,” Progress in Neurobiology, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 95–101, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. Fayolle, B. Verrier, R. Buckland, and T. Fabian Wild, “Characterization of a natural mutation in an antigenic site on the fusion protein of measles virus that is involved in neutralization,” Journal of Virology, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 787–790, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. Waku-Kouomou and T. F. Wild, “Adaptation of wild-type measles virus to tissue culture,” Journal of Virology, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 1505–1509, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. V. Guillaume, H. Aslan, M. Ainouze et al., “Evidence of a potential receptor-binding site on the Nipah virus G protein (NiV-G): identification of globular head residues with a role in fusion promotion and their localization on an NiV-G structural model,” Journal of Virology, vol. 80, no. 15, pp. 7546–7554, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. C. D. Richardson, A. Scheid, and P. W. Choppin, “Specific inhibition of paramyxovirus and myxovirus replication by oligopeptides with amino acid sequences similar to those at the N-termini of the F1 or HA2 viral polypeptides,” Virology, vol. 105, no. 1, pp. 205–222, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. W. J. Bellini, J. S. Rota, L. E. Lowe et al., “Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: more cases of this fatal disease are prevented by measles immunization than was previously recognized,” Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 192, no. 10, pp. 1686–1693, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. V. Lecouturier, J. Fayolle, M. Caballero et al., “Identification of two amino acids in the hemagglutinin glycoprotein of measles virus (MV) that govern hemadsorption, hela cell fusion, CD46 downregulation: Phenotypic markers that differentiate vaccine and wild-type MV strains,” Journal of Virology, vol. 70, no. 7, pp. 4200–4204, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. N. Massé, T. Barrett, C. P. Muller, T. F. Wild, and R. Buckland, “Identification of a second major site for CD46 binding in the hemagglutinin protein from a laboratory strain of measles virus (MV): potential consequences for wild-type MV infection,” Journal of Virology, vol. 76, no. 24, pp. 13034–13038, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  30. C. L. Parks, R. A. Lerch, P. Walpita, H.-P. Wang, M. S. Sidhu, and S. A. Udem, “Comparison of predicted amino acid sequences of measles virus strains in the Edmonston vaccine lineage,” Journal of Virology, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 910–920, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. J. S. Rota, Z.-D. Wang, P. A. Rota, and W. J. Bellini, “Comparison of sequences of the H, F, and N coding genes of measles virus vaccine strains,” Virus Research, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 317–330, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. R. L. Beardsley and J. P. Reilly, “Optimization of guanidination procedures for MALDI mass mapping,” Analytical Chemistry, vol. 74, no. 8, pp. 1884–1890, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. J. P. Gallivan and D. A. Dougherty, “Cation-pi interactions in structural biology,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 96, no. 17, pp. 9459–9464, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. M. Tahara, M. Takeda, and Y. Yanagi, “Altered interaction of the matrix protein with the cytoplasmic tail of hemagglutinin modulates measles virus growth by affecting virus assembly and cell-cell fusion,” Journal of Virology, vol. 81, no. 13, pp. 6827–6836, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. A. Valsamakis, H. Kaneshima, and D. E. Griffin, “Strains of measles vaccine differ in their ability to replicate in and damage human thymus,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 183, no. 3, pp. 498–502, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. WHO, “Expanded programme on immunization—measles control in the WHO African region,” Weekly Epidemiological Record, vol. 71, pp. 201–203, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  37. F. Hanses, A. T. Truong, W. Ammerlaan et al., “Molecular epidemiology of Nigerian and Ghanaian measles virus isolates reveals a genotype circulating widely in western and central Africa,” Journal of General Virology, vol. 80, no. 4, pp. 871–877, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. R. Buckland and H. Kweder, Unpublished observations.
  39. M. Tahara, M. Takeda, and Y. Yanagi, “Contributions of matrix and large protein genes of the measles virus Edmonston strain to growth in cultured cells as revealed by recombinant viruses,” Journal of Virology, vol. 79, no. 24, pp. 15218–15225, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. K. Takeuchi, N. Miyajima, F. Kobune, and M. Tashiro, “Comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of the entire genomes of B95a cell-isolated and vero cell-isolated measles viruses from the same patient,” Virus Genes, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 253–257, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. J. Druelle, C. I. Sellin, D. Waku-Kouomou, B. Horvat, and F. T. Wild, “Wild type measles virus attenuation independent of type I IFN,” Virology Journal, vol. 5, article 22, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. K. Shibahara, H. Hotta, Y. Katayama, and M. Homma, “Increased binding activity of measles virus to monkey red blood cells after long-term passage in vero cell cultures,” Journal of General Virology, vol. 75, no. 12, pp. 3511–3516, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. Y. Katayama, K. Kohso, A. Nishimura, Y. Tatsuno, M. Homma, and H. Hotta, “Detection of measles virus mRNA from autopsied human tissues,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 299–301, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. C. Frecha, C. Lévy, C. Costa et al., “Measles virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer into quiescent lymphocytes requires binding to both SLAM and CD46 entry receptors,” Journal of Virology, vol. 85, no. 12, pp. 5975–5985, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. O. Pernet, C. Pohl, M. Ainouze, H. Kweder, and R. Buckland, “Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis,” Virology, vol. 395, no. 2, pp. 298–311, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus