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Advances in Virology
Volume 2019, Article ID 8512363, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/8512363
Research Article

Poly-ADP Ribosyl Polymerase 1 (PARP1) Regulates Influenza A Virus Polymerase

1Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA
2Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, Alaska, USA
3Institute of Virology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Eric Bortz; ude.aksala@ztrobe

Received 12 November 2018; Revised 16 January 2019; Accepted 11 February 2019; Published 19 March 2019

Academic Editor: Marco Ciotti

Copyright © 2019 Liset Westera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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