Table of Contents
Advances in Zoology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 720365, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/720365
Research Article

Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Aquatic Stages Development Comparison between Insectary and Semifield Structure

1Division of Livestock and Human Health Disease Vector Control, Tropical Pesticides Research Institute, Mosquito Section, P.O. Box 3024, Arusha, Tanzania
2Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology, School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania
3Pan African Mosquito Control Association (PAMCA), P.O. Box 9653, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
4National Institute for Medical Research, Amani Medical Research Centre, P.O. Box 81, Muheza, Tanzania
5National Institute for Medical Research, Headquarters, P.O. Box 9653, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Received 18 September 2014; Revised 10 December 2014; Accepted 10 December 2014

Academic Editor: Cleber Galvão

Copyright © 2015 Eliningaya J. Kweka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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