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Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 724210, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/724210
Research Article

Modeling Cu(II) Binding to Peptides Using the Extensible Systematic Force Field

1Department of Chemistry, Emmanuel College, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, Worcester, MA 01610, USA

Received 10 October 2009; Accepted 5 January 2010

Academic Editor: Konstantinos Tsipis

Copyright © 2010 Faina Ryvkin and Frederick T. Greenaway. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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