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Bone Marrow Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 3495086, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3495086
Research Article

Optimization of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow Derived Immature Dendritic Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Flask Culture Method and Mouse CD11c Positive Selection Kit Method

1Department of Zoonosis, Haffkine Institute for Training, Research and Testing, Parel, Mumbai, India
2Department of Biochemistry and Virology, National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health (NIRRH), Parel, Mumbai, India
3Department of Virology and Immunology, Haffkine Institute for Training, Research and Testing, Parel, Mumbai, India
4Department of Microbiology, Grant Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospital, Byculla, Mumbai, India

Correspondence should be addressed to Rahul Ashok Gosavi; moc.liamg@luhar.ivasog and Vainav Patel; moc.liamg@pvaniav

Received 29 August 2017; Revised 24 November 2017; Accepted 7 December 2017; Published 22 February 2018

Academic Editor: Paolo De Fabritiis

Copyright © 2018 Rahul Ashok Gosavi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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