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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 15792, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/15792
Review Article

The TGF-β1/Upstream Stimulatory Factor-Regulated PAI-1 Gene: Potential Involvement and a Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease

Center for Cell Biology and Cancer Research, Center for Health Sciences, Albany, NY 12208, USA

Received 29 November 2005; Revised 23 February 2006; Accepted 28 February 2006

Copyright © 2006 Paul J. Higgins. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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