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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 75327, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/75327
Mini-Review Article

The Genomic Distribution of L1 Elements: The Role of Insertion Bias and Natural Selection

1Department of Biology, Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing 11367, NY, USA
2Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, New York 10016, NY, USA

Received 5 March 2005; Revised 6 December 2005; Accepted 13 December 2005

Copyright © 2006 Todd Graham and Stephane Boissinot. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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