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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 83757, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/83757
Review Article

siRNA Efficiency: Structure or Sequence—That Is the Question

Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University Berlin, Thielallee 63, Berlin 14195, Germany

Received 26 January 2006; Accepted 3 April 2006

Copyright © 2006 Jens Kurreck. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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