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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2007, Article ID 84656, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/84656
Research Article

Stem Cell Fate Analysis Revisited: Interpretation of Individual Clone Dynamics in the Light of a New Paradigm of Stem Cell Organization

Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology (IMISE), University of Leipzig, Leipzig 04107, Germany

Received 1 November 2006; Revised 2 January 2007; Accepted 21 January 2007

Academic Editor: James L. Sherley

Copyright © 2007 Ingo Roeder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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