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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2007, Article ID 85154, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/85154
Review Article

Immune Response Regulation by Leishmania Secreted and Nonsecreted Antigens

1Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Aníbal Cunha 164, Porto 4099-030, Portugal
2Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular (IBMC), Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, Porto 4150-180, Portugal

Received 26 December 2006; Revised 6 March 2007; Accepted 29 April 2007

Academic Editor: Ali Ouaissi

Copyright © 2007 Nuno Santarém et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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