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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009, Article ID 451084, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/451084
Research Article

Mesothelioma Cells Escape Heat Stress by Upregulating Hsp40/Hsp70 Expression via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

1Molecular Medicine Research Group, The Woolcock Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, 20 Missendon Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia
2Pulmonary Cell Research, Department of Internal Medicine and Research, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland
3Respiratory Cell Research & Pneumology, Lab 305, University Hospital Basel, Hebelstrasse 20, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland

Received 23 February 2009; Accepted 6 April 2009

Academic Editor: Paul Higgins

Copyright © 2009 Michael Roth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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