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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009, Article ID 478785, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/478785
Research Article

Oxaprozin-Induced Apoptosis on CD40 Ligand-Treated Human Primary Monocytes Is Associated with the Modulation of Defined Intracellular Pathways

1Division of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Foundation for Medical Researches, University Hospital of Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland
2Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Genoa, 16143 Genoa, Italy

Received 16 February 2009; Revised 2 June 2009; Accepted 17 June 2009

Academic Editor: Mostafa Z. Badr

Copyright © 2009 Fabrizio Montecucco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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