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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009, Article ID 536918, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/536918
Research Article

Whole Genome Association Study in a Homogenous Population in Shandong Peninsula of China Reveals JARID2 as a Susceptibility Gene for Schizophrenia

1Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan 250062, Shandong, China
2Department of Psychological Medicine, Henry Welcome Building for Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK

Received 17 March 2009; Revised 21 July 2009; Accepted 29 July 2009

Academic Editor: Hatem El-Shanti

Copyright © 2009 Yang Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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